Archive for Witchcraft

Execution of the Day – 2009 (part 38)

Posted in Death penalty with tags , , , , , , on September 17 by Old Sparky

With news just in that 10 November 2009 has been set for the execution of John Allen Muhammad, the man found guilty of the Washington sniper attacks, we head back in time to learn the fate of another band of infamous villains.

17 September 1915 – Augusto Roggen
Augusto Alfredo Roggen was executed in the Tower of London during the 1914–18 First World War. Roggen (or maybe Roggin), originally from Montevideo in Uruguay, was accused of spying for the Germans. And the Brits were onto him.

18 September 1959 – Harvey Murray Glatman
Death by cyanide poisoning was the way US serial killer Harvey Murray Glatman went for a litany of crimes against females. AKA, the ‘Lonely Hearts Killer, Glatman went on a frenzied rampage raping and killing women in LA, tying them up so they couldn’t resist then taking photos so he could capture the moments.

19 September 1692 – Giles Corey
In the grip of the Salem Witch trials, Giles Corey was sentenced to be squashed to death in 1692. The naked 80-year-old was laid down and covered with a board, then stones were heaped on top until the life was crushed out of him. Corey was the one and only man in Massachusetts to be killed in this way.

20 September 1586 – Anthony Babington
It’s about time we had a bit of Elizabethan intrigue to spice up September. Who better to beef things up than Anthony Babington, who brings subterfuge along in spades. The Derbyshire gent headed up a seditious plot to overthrow the then Queen of England in favour of his Catholic benefactor, Mary Stuart.

21 September 1739 – Thomas Lympus
If you thought Crimestoppers was a relatively new initiative, think again. In 1739, an Act of Parliament granted you £200 if you were able to bring in any highway robbers. It may not sound like much nowadays, but £200 was a small fortune in those days. So imagine if the Postmaster General of the day offered to raise that reward by a further £200 – that gives you some idea of how much they wanted our next bloke.

22 September 1692 – Martha Corey
Victim of the Salem witch trials in America, Martha Corey was executed for daring to speak out against a set of young girls. The 17th-century witch trials took place in the Puritanical heartland of America’s north-eastern state of New England. Groups of young girls in Massachusetts were to accuse many members of the townships of witchcraft in what can only be called mass hysteria.

23 September 2003 – Joseph Earl Bates
‘I haven’t really give (sic) it any thought’ said Joseph Earl Bates when asked for his last words. Amazing really when you find out that Bates had sat stewing for 13 years on North Carolina’s death row, waiting to be extinguished for the brutal murder of Charles Edwin Jenkins.

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2 November 2001 – Mona Fandey

Posted in Death penalty, Hanged with tags , , , , on November 2 by Old Sparky

Mona Fandey

Mona Fandey

A pop-singing witch doctor turned murderess, Maznah Ismail aka Mona Fandey was hanged for beheading and dicing a client.

Malaysian Fandey, born Maznah Ismail was sentenced to death for killing a politician – Mazlan Idris – in 1993.After leaving the music business behind, she turned her hand to witchcraft and it was in this guise that Idris sought her out to help his career along.

But her talents didn’t come cheap. Fandey charged him RM 2.5 million in return for a charm that had allegedly boosted a former president’s fortunes. Idris coughed up RM 500,000 in cash along with 10 title deeds as collateral.

He then came round for what he thought was a cleansing ritual, but there was nothing cleansing about it. They got him to trustingly lie on the floor, then Fandey’s helper Juraimi Hussin kindly removed all thoughts of power from the minister’s head by chopping it clean off. They then proceeded to cube him and squirrel bits of him away in a storeroom near the house in Pahang.

Fandey (45), her husband Mohd Affandi Abdul Rahman (44) and helper Hussin (31) were all found guilty of the dastardly deed and were hanged on this day in 1994 at Malaysia’s Kajang Prison near Kuala Lumpur.

Also on this day

2 November 1984 – Velma Barfield
2 November 2005 – Melvin White

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27 October 1441 – Margery Jordemaine

Posted in Burned at the stake, Death penalty with tags , , , , , , on October 27 by Last Writes

With four days to go before Hallowe’en, it seems fitting that we’ve unearthed someone who was slow roasted for being a witch.

Margery Jordemaine (or Jourdemaine or Jourdemayne) was flung on the barbecue at Smithfield after she was found guilty of witchcraft in the 15th century. But not just any old witchcraft – she’d apparently used her sorcery skills in an attempt to bring about the death of Henry VI.

Double trouble

Known as the ‘Witch of Eye’ she was reknowned for her aptitude in divination, and she’d already had her first brush with the law not nine years before, after she’d been arrested alongside two priests. But no charges stuck and she was released.

However she fell foul of the law again after she became embroiled in an apparent plot to overthrow the king, together with Roger Bolingbroke (aka Roger Whiche), John Hunn and Thomas Southwell, headed up by Eleanor Cobham, Duchess of Gloucester.

Hunn (or Hume as some sources refer to him) is said to have shopped the lot of them.

Spellbound

While the duchess was exiled to the Isle of Man, Bolingbroke was hanged, drawn and quartered (more of him on 18 November) and Southwell died in prison, but not so Jordemaine.

Indeed, Jordemaine’s death bucked the trend. Most witches were hanged in those days, however, Jordemaine was burned at the stake as a heretic, because her crime was tantamount to treason.

In case you were wondering, the plot failed and Henry lived to the ripe-ish old age of 49, however he (and this episode) was immortalised in the trilogy by Shakespeare.

Also on this day…

27 October 2001 – Abdul Haq

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22 September 1692 – Martha Corey

Posted in Death penalty, Hanged with tags , , , on September 22 by Old Sparky

Martha Corey

Martha Corey

Victim of the Salem witch trials in America, Martha Corey was executed for daring to speak out against a set of young girls.

The 17th-century witch trials took place in the Puritanical heartland of America’s north-eastern state of New England. Groups of young girls in Massachusetts were to accuse many members of the townships of witchcraft in what can only be called mass hysteria.

They would pretend to be possessed and the juries would get sucked in and believe them.

Martha Corey was one such victim of the accusors after she’d dared to assert that they were liars. The gaggle of hysterical girls turned on her and unleashed their ire in the shape of accusations of witchcraft.

Her loving husband had stood up for her and had already been executed for similar crimes by the painful process of pressing where stones were heaped upon him until the life was slowly pushed out of him and he was crushed to pulp.

Thankfully his wife met an altogether quicker end. Martha Corey was about 60 when she hanged on this day in 1692 just two days after her 80-year-old husband had met his gruesome end.

Also on this day

22 September 2006 – Fabianus Tibo, Dominggus Da Silva and Don Marinus Riwu

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19 September 1692 – Giles Corey

Posted in Death penalty, Pressed with tags , , , , , on September 19 by Old Sparky

Giles Corey

Giles Corey

In the grip of the Salem Witch trials, Giles Corey was sentenced to be squashed to death in 1692.

The naked 80-year-old was laid down and covered with a board, then stones were heaped on top until the life was crushed out of him.

Corey was the one and only man in Massachusetts to be killed in this way.

So what was his heinous crime? His wife was awaiting trial for witchcraft and he’d had the audacity to speak out against his wife’s incarceration and the nonsense going on.

Of course, the harpie-like accusors then mendaciously turned on him accusing him of being a wizard. Naturally he knew he had no hope of being acquitted, so he chose to refuse to stand trial for crimes he had not committed.

The punishment for contempt of court was death by pressing, a slow, painful death.

Not something you see every day

Not something you see every day

Also on this day

19 September 1941 – Eli Richards

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22 July 1612 – Mary Barber

Posted in Death penalty, Hanged with tags , , , on July 22 by Last Writes

If you thought Salem was hot on witch trials at the end of the 17th century, Britain was at it way beforehand, from the end of the 1500s onwards.

So, let us take to you Northampton at beginning of the 1600s where Britain was in the throes of persecution.

Spellbound

James I was pretty anti-witchcraft, having been convinced that he was the target of a spell up in Scotland. So, in 1604 he conjured up a rewrite to the laws, and in doing so, he upped the ante in terms of penalty.

As a result, Mary Barber was one of nine people who were eventually sentenced to be executed for witchcraft – crimes from putting spells on pigs to murder in Northampton.

While Barber didn’t commit murder, she was still found guilty of sorcery and the sentence for this crime was to be hanged together with five others.

Job lot

The execution en masse took place at Abington Gallows in Northampton and she was strung up alongside Agnes and daughter Joan Browne, plus Helen Jenkenson and Arthur Bill. The collective became known as the Witches of Northamptonshire uninspiringly and were the forerunners for a spate of trials in Pendle, up in Lancashire.

In a final twist to this tale, Giles Corey’s roots started off in Northampton round about this time – he was to emigrate to America where he eventually died aged 80, a victim of the Salem trials across the pond. But more of him later in the year…

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