30 September 1952 – Dennis Muldowney 

James Bond creator, Ian Fleming was inspired by the exotic Polish victim slain by today’s deadly desperado’s date with death.

Dennis Muldowney was executed on this day in 1952 for the murder of a Cold-War countess.

Marine steward, Muldowney was jailed and sentenced to death for killing Polish Countess Krystyna Skarbek, aka Christine Granville, who was known for her forays into espionage.

The infamous World War II spy was a key player, passing secrets to the Brits while serving in Germany, Hungary and France. After the war, she came across Ian Fleming and they embarked on a year-long affair.

That’s why she is said to have been the basis for Fleming’s character Vesper Lynd in his first James Bond novel, ‘Casino Royale’, written in 1953 and played by Eva Green in the consequent Bond movie of the same name, as well as Ursula Andress in the spoof version of 1967.

Muldowney was similarly drawn to her and eventually became obsessed, which drove him to stab the 44-year-old to death on 15 June 1952.

He was hanged for his crime at Pentonville prison, aged 41.

Also on this day

30 September 1902 – John McDonald

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6 Responses to “30 September 1952 – Dennis Muldowney ”

  1. Agnieszka Says:

    Hello,

    I was looking for Dennis Muldowney’s image and found your website. Unfortunately, the picture above is of Andrzej Kowerski, Christinas partner, and not of D. Muldowney, her murderer. Please check on websites about Christina…

    A.

  2. janet muldowney Says:

    hello i would be interested in any further information anyone may have on dennis muldowney.He was my uncle

  3. Gary E Nelson Says:

    The photo above is not Dennis Muldowney but Andrzej Kowerski who enjoyed a love affair with Krystyna Skarbek.

    http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/SOEkennedy.htm

    Gary E Nelson, SSgt, Retired
    DC National Guard Historian

  4. William Higgins Says:

    Why do you call Christine “infamous”? “Celebrated” of “famous” would be better adjectives.

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